Free Shipping on All U.S. Orders
All Orders Processed on a Secure Server
Vintage Tent Trailer Plans
Build a Tent Camper on a Bolt Together Frame

Cover of plans for building a pop up tent camper on a standard bolt together trailer frame.
Vintage Tent
Trailer Plans
Build a Tent Camper on a Bolt Together Frame
Get these vintage trailer plans PDF Format
All Orders Processed
On a Secure Server
Price $12.95
Get a restored copy of these vintage Pop Up Tent Trailer Plans with 19 Pages of Enhanced and Enlarged Figures and Illustrations and Searchable Text.
We will email these plans, to the address provided with your payment, within 48 hours following receipt of your order.
|More Vintage Trailer Plans|
Hard Top Tent Camper Rides
Dual- Use Trailer
Compact for trailering, the camper is easy to maneuver into choice campsites.Build it on a chassis you already own, a boat or bike  trailer, and get double use, or buy a standard bolt together trailer for ease of constuction.
Compact for trailering, the camper is easy to maneuver into choice campsites. Table attaches to outside for open-air dining (below).
Table attaches to outside of trailer for open-air dining.
Build it on a chassis you already own, a boat or bike trailer, and get double use, or buy a standard bolt together trailer for ease of constuction.

By MACK PHILIPS

A hardtop folding trailer is to the old-fashioned camping tent what a modern sports car is to a Model T. The convenience of easy setup, combined with the greater comfort of flattop head room and sleeping high off the ground. have made this type of camper one of the most popular on the road.

Many readers have requested plans for building one, but we felt such a project should have a special feature not available in the many fine commercial models that range in price from a basic $300 sleeper to fully equipped luxury rigs costing nearly $3,000.

I, too, wanted to build my own camper for family vacations, but I hesitated to invest in a vehicle that I'd be able to use only once or twice a year and which would take up year-round parking space - especially since I'd need another trailer for hauling jobs.

My Solution: Build a detachable camping unit that could he mounted on an existing trailer chassis. If you already own a boat or bike trailer, you can easily adapt my design to fit it. If you're starting from scratch, you can buy a bolt-together trailer chassis (I chase one from Sears' catalog, but many others will do the job) and adapt it to additional uses.

The camper body detaches from the chassis in half an hour - the time it takes to jack it up, unplug wiring and remove a handful of bolts. Since the camper is basically a flat bottom box, you could insulate the floor and mount it on skis for a wintertime camper. or even put it aboard a motorized raft and have a waterborne shelter.

How It Works: Erected for use, the foam-plastic top (reinforced with glass cloth and resin) is supported on four hinged conduit corner posts. Part of the raising load is counter balanced by a pair of heavy screen door springs at each hinge joint. Should those springs weaken in time, they can be replaced for about a half-dollar each.
The tent portion of the camper is permanently fastened around the inside of the hardtop, and it all tucks under, storing compactly, when the tamper is folded.

The inner portions of both bed frames are a fixed part of the body. The outer portions hinge out to make a portable bedroom (for four) about 12' wide. The tent is stretched over the bed frames, and held to the body and frames with snaps and elastic shock cord. Center head room inside is about 6 ft. 2 1/2 in.

Folded, the camper is sealed weathertight for travel or storage with weatherstripping around the door and under the edge of the hardtop.
 

Upside-down, trailer chassis is positioned on camper floor so you can  mark for Tee nut holes. Trailer detaches for other uses.
Upside-down, trailer chassis is positioned on camper floor so you can mark for Tee nut holes. Trailer detaches for other uses.
Dual-use table comes inside for shelter or privacy. When removed, there’s standing space for four. Note Storage under beds.
Dual-use table comes inside for shelter or privacy. When removed, there's standing space for four. Note Storage under beds.
Materials Are Standard: All the various round shapes used to build the camper are standard sizes of steel pipe, thin wall electrical conduit, Reynolds "do-it-yourself" aluminum tubing, and wood closet pole. Aside from a bit of white pine for stiffeners, all wood is exterior plywood. Body material is 3/8 in. exterior Masonite X-90 primed house siding. One 4-by-8 sheet is required.

You may choose - with a sturdy sewing machine and a good seamstress - to tackle the canvas work yourself, following the assembly details given in our plans, or you may want to have the tent portion made up by a local tent and awning or upholstery shop, as we did.

One morning we turned the completed camper over to a small shop That makes a lot of custom boat covers, pickup covers, tents and the like. We had it back all completed the same evening. The price was quite reasonable, considering the 20-plus yards of heavy 12-ounce duck they used for the job. They were willing to oblige with any degree of fanciness in the way of zippers, colors, window size, and so on.

The Foam-Plastic Top: The only thing very special in the way of materials is the urethane foam used for the top. We've made arrangements with a plastic-foam supplier to offer 1/2"-thick four-pound (Per cu. ft.) rigid urethane foam plastic in sheets sized for easy handling. A sturdy glass cloth is already applied to both sides with a temporary "glue" - just enough to keep the cloth stuck in place while you're working with it and applying resin. This is a tremendous help in easing assembly. (For address, see end of article.)

We chose the new Sears No. 6157 trailer because it is low-priced, readily available by mail   (shipped knocked down, it weighs about 200 pounds), and because it was just about the right length (82 in.) to support full-length beds, and wide enough (63 1/2 in.) to give a roomy center aisle (39 in. wide). Catalog price: $140.

The body overhangs the frame 1 in. at both ends and 3 in. on each side; this gives good support to the body and still allows it to be removed from the frame.

Modified Sears foldaway trailer jacks attach permanently to the body and temporarily to the frame to support it when jacked up for leveling and provide 5 in. of adjustment. If you do not intend to remove the body you may want to buy foot-operated camper jacks from a local camper dealer and weld or bolt them directly to the frame.

A trailer chassis of the size chosen is ideal for the alternate installation of a plywood deck with a light steel angle around the edge for transporting two bikes, a snowmobile, or a garden tractor. Sideboards added to a plywood deck make a good utility hauling trailer.

One drawback of this Sears trailer is that it does not have fixed-hub wheels for its 4.80-by-4.00-8 four-ply tires. This means you have to remove the wheel bearings to change a tire. You may want to build your own chassis from locally available components, or purchase a comparable bolt-together chassis with the same dimensions. A good mail-order source for axles, springs, and wheel assemblies for homebuilt will be found in the parts-suppliers list (end of article).

Built of waterproof, marine plywood, she is as water tight and sound as a boat. Trailer itself is 12 1/2 feet long (overall), 6 feet 5 inches wide, and six feet in height. The cost of material will run approximately $300.00, including running gear, and a full-size inner spring mattress. Trailer wheels and axle purchased at a trailer parts house are best, but if expense has to be watched, purchase the front end of a late model car at some wrecking yard.

After checking the wheels for alignment, the spindle bolts should be welded solid, making wheels and axle one unit. When 2000-pound springs are U-bolted to the axle, they may have to be underslung - this you will have to check, as axles differ. Angle iron or old automobile frames are cut and assembled, Fig. 1.

Takes two to raise the roof
Unfasten latches and lift one end of the top, pinning hinge joints of support tubes. Jacks are already extended, pinned and leveled.
Unfasten latches and lift one end of the top, pinning hinge joints of support tubes. Jacks are already extended, pinned and leveled.
Lift other end until the first end’s supports can be seated and pinned into body brackets. Then pin hinge brackets of other end.
Lift other end until the first end's supports can be seated and
pinned into body brackets. Then pin hinge brackets of other end.
You can make the camper almost any length (the foam top sheets are 7 ft. 4 in. long) and any width, but keep these facts in mind: Body length must be at least 4 1/2 in. longer than the bed frames to allow for folding, and the bed frames should be at least as long as the mattresses used. Body width can be a little greater than the 70 in. called for in the plans (if you want a wider aisle), but if you made the body narrower, the folded-in bed frames will overlap. This is of no great consequence except that it will cut down storage space between the frames and the top. As dimensioned, the folded bed frames just clear each other at the center.

Choose a chassis of at least 1,000-pound rated capacity (our trailer with Sears chassis, loaded with essential camping gear, weighs about 750-800 pounds), capable of being safely towed at highway speeds.

To give adequate support to the camper body, a narrow chassis such as a boat trailer with wheels outboard of the frame could be modified by adding bolt-on steel-angle outriggers to the frame rails.

For maximum stability, a trailer should have about 10 to 15 percent of its total gross weight in the form of a tongue load. On a unit of this size, you wouldn't want to exceed 125 pounds. Knowing the camper body will weigh a pretty evenly distributed 500 - 550 pounds, you can plan on where to position it on a chassis

How To Go About Building: Recognizing that dimensions and procedures may change with the size and materials you choose, here is how to go at the project.

Saw the 3/4" exterior plywood for the floor. Widthwise it takes a full sheet plus about half another. Ends, and the remainder of the second sheet are used for raw panels, door, gussets, wheel wells, etc. Join floor pieces with a spline joint, using 3/8 in. plywood as the spline.

Cut out openings for wheel wells, allowing an inch clearance all around for oscillation. Well depth (2 in. in our case) is calculated on the basis of the height that the tire could come through the floor if the spring should bottom.

Drill 7/16 in. holes around the top flanges of the frame for bolting on the body. We used 18 bolts, locating one hole as near each corner as possible and evenly spacing them around.

Lay the chassis upside down on the floor and mark frame hole locations. At the same time, drill and cut four pieces 1/8 in. by-1/8 in. by 1 in. steel angle to fit across the floor to add rigidity and support the floor when the body is undecked. Drill holes for Tee nuts. Counterbore these holes from the top side so the Tee nut flanges can be driven flush with the floor.

 
Swing out bed flaps at each end and  attach the tubes that brace these against the camper body. Shakes folds out of the tent fabric.
Swing out bed flaps at each end and attach the tubes that brace these against the camper body. Shakes folds out of the tent fabric.
Pivot up tent supports at outer edge of flaps. Then snap tent to flaps and body. To fold the unit for travel, reverse the procedure.
Pivot up tent supports at outer edge of flaps. Then snap tent to flaps and body. To fold the unit for travel, reverse the procedure.
Coat the floor bottom and the inside of the wheel wells with asphaltic coating, cut for easy brushing with naphtha if you wish.

The 4-by-8 sheets of 3/4 in. exterior plywood make the bed frames - one bed from each sheet.

Glue and screw the preassembled sides and ends to the floor. Use waterproof resorcinol glue for all gluing on the camper. Before adding the inner "benches" that form the fixed part of the bedframes, drill the floor corners for the telescoping jack housing conduit. Fit the door, leaving a gap at the piano hinge for the 3/16 in. weather stripping to be applied later.

Regular boat-glassing polyester resin, mixed with a catalyst so it will harden, is used to "glass" the top. 
Three sheets of urethane make up the top. The fourth sheet is cut into strips (using a utility knife) for the side and ends. Make the top about 1/8 in. larger in each direction than the body. Strip back the glass cloth and insert l/2 in. plywood plugs where corner-post bolts and latches will be. Glue (with resin) 3/8 in. plywood strips to inside surfaces of side and end pieces. When set up, cover with 6 in. cloth tape. Cut the three top sheets to length and glue a wood rail strip down the center of each.

Set the sub-assembled side and end pieces right on top of the body. Apply resin at joints. Nail plywood to plywood at comers with finishing nails. Use masking tape to hold plastic together while curing.

Cut scrap plywood the same shape as the endpieces to give temporary support to top sheets, as shown in the photo. Bevel edges of top sheets to fit well at center joints. Apply resin at all joining surfaces and tape in place.

When cured, apply resin to the rail strips that hide the joints in top sheets, tape them in place, and turn the top upside down on a flat surface. Nail through the foam near the edges and into the rail strip, using large headed plasterboard nails to pull the fairly limber foam into full smooth contact with the rail strip.

Bevel all foam edges topside with a knife and round them smooth with coarse sandpaper. Leave the bottom corners of the top square about 1 1/2 in. up for application of molding.

Apply resin and glass tape over the rails (6 in. wide), and all edges and joints inside and out (2 in. wide). Glass in corner-reinforcing plates. Fill any objectionable voids with epoxy putty.

Give the entire top a full coat of resin to bond the cloth to the foam. Sand out any rough spots and feather the tape edges. Apply another complete coat of resin and sand completely smooth. Paint the entire top with two coats of automotive enamel, sanding between coats. Priming is not required.

Drill support-rod bolt holes, install molding, latch plates, lifting handles, and reflectors. Apply pressure-sensitive weatherstrip around the edge under the molding.

Exploded view of tent trailer built on a bolt together chassis construction with dimensions.
Exploded view of tent trailer built on a bolt together chassis construction with dimensions.
Set the Body on the Chassis: Bolt it down. Install the hinging bed-flaps. Drill the frame for the studs that hold the lower end of the bed-flap support tubes. Epoxy and screw on the hinges that hold the top end of the tubes. Trim tubes so flaps are level when folded out. Make up and install corner jacks.

Paint the body inside and out. Attach aluminum molding around the body, sealing with caulking.

When installing lights, keep in mind that wiring should be along the frame, with connectors installed near the rear light locations, if your trailer is to be undecked. Carpeting or other floor covering may be installed now.

Set the top on the body. Fasten latches to compress weatherstrip all around. Make up and fully assemble the four hinging corner-support tube units, including the bolts that fasten them to the camper. Drill pin and bolt holes the same size as the fasteners to make the assemblies as tight as possible.

Using one unit as a fixture, insert bottom bolt in body hole, position tube exactly vertical, then determine and mark location of support brackets at all four corners.

Apply clear lacquer or exterior polyurethane to all exposed metal parts that may corrode or rust.

Fold hinging supports and insert bolts into top and body holes. Locate and install support brackets under folded tubes. The top can now be raised, supports pinned, and locknuts installed to bolts inside.

Check out the lights, tire pressures. hitch, and jack. Be sure all bolts are tight. Once your license plate is attached, take the trailer for a shakedown spin.

Safety and Law: If you buy a new chassis, it will be called an "incomplete vehicle." To comply with federal laws, it must have two red tail lights, two red reflectors, two brake lights, two turn signals, and a clear license plate lamp. A trailer should also have Class-A amber reflectors at all four front corners and red reflectors at rear corners. If your trailer is over 80 in. wide, the law calls for clearance lights.

A good trailer hitch - with at least a 1-inch ball - is needed on the car. Be sure to install safety chains as well.

Check your state laws regarding trailer licensing. You may have to reach an understanding on dual us of the chassis where laws require special licensing of a camping trailer. Your project may well be called either "home-built" or "reconstructed." 

The camper body is a plywood box with hinged flaps on each side.
Assemble the body on blocks, using simple butt joints secured with waterproof glue and screws. Screwheads are covered with caulked aluminum molding after unit is painted. Note wheel box  between two support posts.
Assemble the body on blocks, using simple butt joints secured with waterproof glue and screws. Screwheads are covered with caulked aluminum molding after unit is painted. Note wheel box between two support posts.
Un-deck the Body: Procedure may vary with your particular construction, but basically you unpin and lower the corner jacks. Remove all the bolts that attach the body to the frame. It may be necessary to remove two of the frame jack brackets, as well. Jack the body evenly about 1 in. off the frame - to clear the angles under the floor, and simply pull the chassis out from under. Reverse the procedure to remount the body.

If wheels are much higher than the frame top, some provision must be made to jack the body higher to clear. We suggest you remove the wheels.

The body must be securely blocked for support if stored. The jack and floor construction are not suited for extended support without the frame. Don't, under any circumstances. get under the body while it is supported only on jacks.

Bed-flap support tubes are flattened at one end to slip over heavy T-hinge (narrow the hinge  tongue if necessary). Screw and  epoxy hinge to wood.
Bed-flap support tubes are flattened at one end to slip over heavy T-hinge (narrow the hinge tongue if necessary). Screw and epoxy hinge to wood.
Flaps are hinged to body with 7/8-inch gap along the side to let top clear when camper is folded. Notch to left of hinge is for clearance of side latch.
Flaps are hinged to body with 7/8-inch gap along the side to let top clear when camper is folded. Notch to left of hinge is for clearance of side latch.

 
How the Hardware Works
Accurate drilling of tent assemblies (shortened mockup show here) is essential for folding. Level hinge plate in both directions and drill holes on centerline.
Accurate drilling of tent assemblies (shortened mockup show here) is essential for folding. Level hinge plate in both directions and drill holes on centerline.
Pin support tubes into braces as you lift the top. Brackets are formed on homemade jig. Note also how jack is pinned to frame bracket when extended for stabilizing.
Pin support tubes into braces as you lift the top. Brackets are formed on homemade jig. Note also how jack is pinned to frame bracket when extended for stabilizing.
Folding leg brackets are adapted to hold aluminum tubing by bolting through hardwood cradles. Tubing support tent at outer edges of bed flap as shown in sketch.
Folding leg brackets are adapted to hold aluminum tubing by bolting through hardwood cradles. Tubing support tent at outer edges of bed flap as shown in sketch.
Retracted jack is locked for travel by means of a slot that prevents unscrewing and by off-center pin hole. Support tube is shown in folded position, with top down for travel.
Retracted jack is locked for travel by means of a slot that prevents unscrewing and by off-center pin hole. Support tube is shown in folded position, with top down for travel.
Putting the Top on the Tent Camper
Plywood strips reinforce side and end panels.Fasten 3/8-inch thick strips to inside faces of foam (flush with base edge) using resin; cover with 6-inch cloth tape, more resin.
Plywood strips reinforce side and end panels. Fasten 3/8-inch thick strips to inside faces of foam (flush with base edge) using resin; cover with 6-inch cloth tape, more resin.
Reinforce foam where support-tube bearings and latches attach. Cut away 2-inch squares, glue in 1/2-inch plywood inserts to keep foam compressing under force.


Reinforce foam where support-tube bearings and latches attach. Cut away 2-inch squares, glue in 1/2-inch plywood inserts to keep foam compressing under force.
Glue up foam top by setting it on body assembly; keep resin drops off body with waxed paper. Partially-driven finishing nails and masking tape hold parts together while curing.
Glue up foam top by setting it on body assembly; keep resin drops off body with waxed paper. Partially-driven finishing nails and masking tape hold parts together while curing.
Shaped blocks of 3/4-inch plywood are glassed inside four corners to add bearing for top support tubes. Note that the plywood center struts in previous photo are now discarded.
Shaped blocks of 3/4-inch plywood are glassed inside four corners to add bearing for top support tubes. Note that the plywood center struts in previous photo are now discarded.
Apply top edge molding over a bead of caulk. Plastic insert hides sheet metal screws that fasten molding through foam and into the plywood reinforcement strips inside.
Apply top edge molding over a bead of caulk. Plastic insert hides sheet metal screws that fasten molding through foam and into the plywood reinforcement strips inside.
Self-stick fabric tape can hide raw edge of tent where it’s stabled to the plywood strips inside the bottom edge of the fiberglass top. It helps interior appearance.
Self-stick fabric tape can hide raw edge of tent where it's stapled to the plywood strips inside the bottom edge of the fiberglass top. It helps interior appearance.
Combination screen-flap windows made be made any desired size. Inside view shows how flaps can be zippered at sides to allow partial opening without losing privacy.
Combination screen-flap windows made be made any desired size. Inside view shows how flaps can be zippered at sides to allow partial opening without losing privacy.
Latches are snapped for travel – two to a side –  to prevent top from coming loose. They can be locked with cotter pins. Note plated window lift to aid in raising top.
Latches are snapped for travel - two to a side - to prevent top from coming loose. They can be locked with cotter pins. Note plated window lift to aid in raising top.
Where to Buy the Materials:

Urethane foam comes 1/2 in. thick, four-pound density with unsaturated cloth laminated to both sides. W. H. Porter, Inc., 4240 No. 136th Ave., Holland. Mich. 49421, offers four 24 in by 76 in. sheets packed in a protective carton for shipping via freight. The price to is $45 f.o.b. Holland (freight charges collect).

For "T" handle, extruded aluminum molding, trim molding with insert strip, wheel assemblies, springs, and axles: Viking Camper Supply, 99 Glenwood Ave., Minneapolis 55403.

For the No. 149 folding leg brackets: Minnesota Woodworkers Supply, 925 Winnetka Ave., Minneapolis 55427.

For "epoxy-bond" adhesive putty, shock cord, stainless table brackets, "Dot" snap fasteners, polyester resin, glass-cloth tape: Defender Industries, 384 Broadway, New York City 10013.

For nylon rod, polyester resin: Cope Plastics, 111 W. Delmar Ave., Godfrey, Ill, 62035.

Sears items: your nearest Sears Roebuck retail or catalog store. The camp stove shown in the photos is Sears No. 72301. The sink is a Porta-Sink brand. Camper mattresses are Sears No. 79012.

Save with Vintage Plan Deals
|See All Vintage Trailer Plans|
Any 2 Vintage Trailer Plans
$19.95 FREE Shipping
Select 2 Vintage Travel Trailer Plans
 

 
Any 3 Vintage Trailer Plans
$24.95 FREE Shipping
Select 3 Vintage Travel Trailer Plans
 
 
3

 
Any 4 Vintage Trailer Plans
$29.95 FREE Shipping
Select 4 Vintage Travel Trailer Plans
 
 
 
4
Any 6 Vintage Trailer Plans
$36.95 FREE Shipping
Select 6 Vintage Travel Trailer Plans
 
 
 
 
 

This modern chassis makes an excellent base for your teardrop trailer project, lightweight camping trailer, or vintage travel trailer build.
Teardrop Chassis Plans
Build a Teardrop Chassis
without Welding
eBook
PDF Format
Price $12.95
Learn more about these plans >>
Utility Chassis Plans
Build a Utility Trailer
without Welding
eBook PDF Format
Price $12.95
Lean more about these plans >>

Buy  Both
Build a Teardrop Trailer Chassis
and
Build a Utility Trailer
Together and Save 20% !
eBook
PDF Format
Price $19.95

RedStoneProjects.com Home
SAVE With Multi-Plans Deals!
Project Plans
Concealment End Table Plans
Quilt Rack Plans
Crossbow Plans
Catapult Plans
Craftsman Style Plans
Water Screw Plans
Tobacco Pipe Rack Plans
Shooting Sports Plans
Reloading Bench Plans
Closet Reloading Bench Plans
Brass Cleaning Bench Plans
Small Reloading Bench Plans
Corner Reloading Bench Plans
Two Sided Shooting Bench Plans
Nativity Stable Plans
Trailer Plans
No Weld Teardrop Trailer Chassis
No Weld Utility Trailer
Vintage Trailer Plans
Vintage Travel Trailer Plans Collection
16 Foot Canned Ham Vacation Trailer
Craftsman Hardside Folding Camper Trailer Plans
1947 Thousand Addresses Travel Trailer Plans
Bungalow Folding Tent Camper Trailer Plans
1937 Runlite Lightweight Travel Trailer Plans
1947 Treadrop Trailer for Two Plans
1935 Pullman Trailer Plans
1940 14 Foot Cabin Trailer Plans
1951 Lightweight Sportsman's Trailer
1956 18 Foot Family Vacation Trailer
1934 17 Foot House Trailer
DIY Pop Up Camper Trailer Plans
1960 Fold Up Trailer with Slide Out Plans
1953 Wild Goose Kamp Master Trailer Plans
1935 Jim Dandy Cabin Cruiser Trailer Plans
Vintage How To Build Trailers eBook
Hardside Pop-Up Camper Plans
Wanderbug Lightweight Vacation Trailer Plans
Streamline Family Vacation Trailer Plans
Tent On Wheels Folding Trailer Plans
Lil Guy Micro Camper Trailer Plans
Traveler Wood Framed Travel Trailer Plans
Vintage Roadside Chuck Wagon Trailer Plans
Pickup Truck Pop Up Camper Plans
Hardside Roof Top Pop Up Sleeper Plans
Low Profile Pickup Truck Camper Plans
Vintage Streamline Teardrop Trailer Plans
Vintage 1956 Camp Trailer Plans
Modern Conestoga Trailer Plans
1947 Trail Scout Camper Plans
Vintage Bolt Together Tent Trailer Plans
Vintage 1947 Wanderer Canned Ham Trailer Plans
Mobile Vacation Home Plans
Lightweight Expanding Trailer Plans
Simple and Rugged Truck Camper Plans
Sleeps 4 Expanding Truck Camper Plans
Vintage Boat Plans
Sea Craft 25 Foot Cabin Cruiser Plans
21 Foot "Luxury" Shanty Boat Plans
20 Foot Budget Houseboat Plans
DIY Project Books
Build Three Working Model Catapults
Build Five Craftsman Style Tobacco Pipe Racks
Build a Reloading Bench and a Reloading Brass Cleaning and Sorting Bench
Vintage Trailer Mugs
Trailer Articles
Pulling a Motorcycle Trailer
Building a Motorcycle Trailer
DIY Tent Trailer
Build a Budget Tent Trailer
The Trailer Grows Up
Motorcycle Rallies
Americade Motorcycle Rally

 
Contact Us Privacy Policy Plans License